The Value of Nice in Your Business

 

Getting money is not all a man's business: to cultivate kindness is a valuable part of the business of life. – Samuel Johnson

For whatever reason, at least in the working world, does it seem like  the word “nice” has disappeared from the dictionary of business terms? It is almost as if  “nice” has become synonymous with weak or indecisive.

NEWS FLASH:  [Tweet “You can be nice and still be strong. You can be nice and be a leader. You can be nice and be successful.”]

I would not be where I am today if I had been selfish, mean, and hard. I strongly believe that kindness and empathy are what make great companies stand out from the crowd. Being able to do what you do well AND do it with compassion and personality, that is what I call success.

So what is the value of “nice” in business? Is there a “Return on Investment” (ROI) in being nice? Clearly, people's opinions differ on this topic, but I believe that it is a huge asset for businesses. There are many ways to define success: the accomplishment of one's goals, increased productivity, performance, quality, revenues, as well as subjective success such as happiness and the feeling of making a real connection with other people.

Encouraging a positive environment in the workplace can lead to several benefits like: recruiting top talent (when facing multiple job offers, a person often chooses a company based on the “overall feel”), increased productivity (when a worker is placed in a positive environment they are more inclined to work hard), reduced costs (this goes hand in hand with increased productivity), and positive public image (what your employees, fans, and followers say about you over the Internet can make or break a business).

[Tweet “A little nice goes a long way, especially in social media.”]

Social media bolsters brand value in a big way. When the reputation of your business has a lot to do with what people are saying about you online, it pays to have an online presence where you are known for being a “nice” company.

A good example of a company that takes advantage of being nice on social media is Comcast. Comcast is the largest cable operator, one of the biggest mass media, home Internet service providers, and the third largest home telephone service providers in the United States. One way they are “nice” is they have multiple employees with Twitter accounts that help Comcast users in need. Comcast has really gone above and beyond to show that they care by offering exceptional customer service extending all of the way to monitoring problems on Twitter. Even if @Comcast hasn't been directly mentioned, they are likely to find Tweets complaining of their services and offer their help.

What is your opinion on the value of being “nice” in business? Does it get you far? Or, do you believe that the nice guy really does finish last? Give your input in the comments below!

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Lisa Manyon
Lisa Manyon
9 years ago

Kim, You are right on track. Nice matters. AND people are 10X’s more likely to share a negative customer service story than a positive one — sad but true — and all the more reason to play nice.
Write on!~

Kim
Kim
Reply to  Lisa Manyon
9 years ago

Thanks for dropping by, Lisa 🙂

Danielle Rogers
Danielle Rogers
9 years ago

I COMPLETELY agree with the “nice” concept. I ordered business cards from Vista Print and gave an incorrect address (gave 1304 and should have been 1034.) Clearly, it was MY mistake! I contacted them, shared my apologies and stated I was at fault. They replied to my email is LESS THAN 24 hours and told me they were sending a duplicate order FREE OF CHARGE! And if my former order arrived, I could just keep it! THAT is the definiiton of nice! Needless to say, I will be ordering MANY more items from Vista Print!

Kim
Kim
Reply to  Danielle Rogers
9 years ago

Next time you need something, guess who you are going to order from? Vistaprint, right? GREAT example of customer service and the value of being nice!

Kristin Barker
Kristin Barker
9 years ago

I don’t know that “nice” is the best word for describing what I think business should be in order to be successful. Maybe better words are “fair”, “honest”, “transparent” and “helpful”. But then again, these things are “nice”.

Kim
Kim
Reply to  Kristin Barker
9 years ago

Yes, they are, Kristin!

Marie
Marie
9 years ago

Yes! Yes! Yes! I have spent my whole life being nice! That does not mean weak, indecisive or wimpy. Everyone who chooses to put others first does. That doesn’t change who I am… a caring, loving, kind, nice person who genuinely wants the best possible for others. Blessings to you, Kim! Marie

Kim
Kim
Reply to  Marie
9 years ago

Love hearing this, Marie! Thanks for dropping in!

Keeon Taylor
Keeon Taylor
9 years ago

Nice is strong. That’s a powerful statement. My niche is in fitness and someone asked me a question via my Facebook page. After several messages between myself and the individual, I answered the question several ways. I posted a video on YouTube and the answer on my page as well as answering the person privately. By being “nice” I have an engaged person for a long time. Maybe even a customer in the future.

Susan
Susan
Reply to  Keeon Taylor
9 years ago

Being nice not only has a direct business impact, but it also becomes part of both your personal brand…and your business brand. Great advice!

Kim Garst
Kim Garst
Reply to  Susan
9 years ago

Absolutely! Thanks for stopping by Susan!

Peg McMahan
Peg McMahan
9 years ago

Kim, this is so true. Just simply being nice doesn’t cost anything to provide, makes me feel good, and actually helps the person I’m talking to. Sometimes a nice word can change someone’s bad day for the better.

Kim
Kim
Reply to  Peg McMahan
9 years ago

Totally agree, Peg :-). Thanks for dropping in!

Robert
Robert
9 years ago

I would always go back to businesses that are “nice” to use your word, Kim. I believe that being nice doesn’ t cost you anything and can make your day better. I believe in being nice to anyone I speak with.

Kim
Kim
Reply to  Robert
9 years ago

Nice doesn’t cost a thing but it can generate a lot of monetization as a result of being nice 🙂

Rajeev
Rajeev
9 years ago

I completely agree with you Kim, but i would like to add that while planning & executing, one has to be realistic, ruthless, cunning, clever & wise at the same time. But while dealing with people, it is good to be nice, it builds trust which is very valuable in business.

Kim
Kim
Reply to  Rajeev
9 years ago

I agree, you have to be smart when it comes to your business and how you engage with others.

Kim Garst
Kim Garst
9 years ago

Absolutely! Thanks for stopping by Kyri!

Kim Garst
Kim Garst
9 years ago

Absolutely! Going above and beyond, I love it Doris! Thanks for sharing!

Kim Garst
Kim Garst
9 years ago

Can’t wait to hear how it works for you John… my experience is being nice goes much further than anything else with people.

Kim Garst
Kim Garst
9 years ago

Absolutely! Thanks for stopping by and sharing!

jill colomy
jill colomy
9 years ago

I will be forever Grateful for your help. thanks so much.

Kim
Kim
9 years ago

We have an affiliate program and I can promise that we are legitimate and will honor payouts 🙂

Kim
Kim
9 years ago

Recognition is huge for sure! Thanks for sharing your thoughts, Dawn!

Kim
Kim
9 years ago

I am a firm believer that those that play nice will be the big winners in the end. It is becoming more and more value based as people are tired of the disconnected marketplace. Nice on, Patricia 🙂

Kim Garst
Kim Garst
8 years ago

I love that! H-U-G Hear, Understand and Give back incredible value! Thank you so much for sharing!

Nely
Nely
Reply to  Kim Garst
8 years ago

Thanks to you Kim for taking time to seeing it.

Kim Garst
8 years ago

I love Bob Burg and I agree! People do do more business with those that they know, like and trust.

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